Microsoft Excel 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013 Tips
The Excel Addict - Help with Excel 2013, 2010, 2007, 2003
October 8, 2015

Greetings from The Excel Addict
Hi fellow Excel Addict,

Sorry, due to a family matter I wasn't able to get my October 8 newsletter
out on time.

Have a great weekend,

Francis Hayes (The Excel Addict)
Email: 
fhayes[AT]TheExcelAddict.com



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"If I have the belief that I can do it, I shall surely acquire the capacity to do it even if I may not have it at the beginning." -- Mahatma Gandhi

"If I have the belief that I can do it, I shall surely acquire the capacity
to do it even if I may not have it at the beginning." -- Mahatma Gandhi



Today's Microsoft Excel Tip

Adjusting Your Print Area and Page Breaks The Easy Way

As you build a worksheet, Excel automatically inserts page breaks that divide it into separate pages for printing. The placement of these page breaks is based on factors such as paper size, margin settings, scale options, and the positions of any manual page breaks that you may have inserted.

Often, these automatic page breaks wll not divide your worksheet exactly as you want. You can override these automatic page breaks by inserting your own manual page breaks, moving existing manual page breaks, or deleting any manually-inserted page breaks.

Page Break Indicator Normal View in Microsoft Excel 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013, 365
Although you can work with page breaks in Normal worksheet view by using the Breaks commands in the Page Layout group, there is a better way. Page Break Preview is a feature that allows you to view your entire worksheet broken into pages exactly as will be printed, with print area, page breaks and page numbers indicated.

In this mode, you can manually adjust your page breaks and print area using your mouse, right in your worksheet. You still have access to all of Excel's commands and can interact with your spreadsheet as usual.

Use Excel's Page Break Preview to easily adjust your page breaks and print area right in your worksheet
In addition to allowing you to adjust your page breaks and print area, Page Break Preview mode also shows you how other changes you make (such inserting rows, adjusting column widths and formatting changes) affect the placement of automatic page breaks.

Activate Page Break Preview mode:
Use either of these methods to activate the Page Break Preview mode:

1) From the View tab, click Page Break Preview from the Workbook Views group;

2) Click the Page Break Preview icon to the right of the Status Bar at the bottom right corner of your Excel window;

Use this icon to quickly access the Page Break Preview window in Excel 2007, 2010, 2013
3) Press ALT, WI.

Automatic and Manual Page Breaks in Page Break Preview
By default, Excel automatically calculates where page breaks will occur when a worksheet is printed. However, if you need to have page breaks occur at a different location, you can insert a new manual page break or adjust an existing page break.

Automatic page breaks are displayed 
as dashed blue lines.

Manual page breaks are displayed as solid blue lines.

Automatic And Manual Page Breaks in Microsoft Excel 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013, 365

Moving existing page breaks:
Since adjusting one page break can affect the page breaks that follow, it's often best to start from the top of your worksheet and work your way down.

Position the mouse pointer over any of the blue lines and, when it changes to a two-headed arrow, drag it to a new position. Once you adjust an automatic page break, it becomes a manual page break.

Move An Existing Page Break in Microsoft Excel 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013, 365

Insert a manual page break:
1) Click on a row heading (i.e. 1,2,3) or a cell in column A where you want to insert a horizontal page break. Click on column heading (i.e. A,B,C) or a cell in Row 1 where you want to insert a vertical page break;

2) Right click and choose Insert Page Break (or click the Page Layout tab and in the Page Setup group, click Breaks then Insert Page Break);

Insert Manual Page Break in Microsoft Excel 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013, 365

Removing a manual page break:
1) Select the row or cell immediately below a manual page break (i.e. solid blue line);

2) Right click and choose Remove Page Break (or click the Page Layout tab and in the Page Setup group, click Breaks then Remove Page Break).

Remove Manual Page Break in Microsoft Excel 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013, 365
NOTE: You cannot remove an automatic page break.

Resetting all page breaks:
Resetting all page breaks removes all manually-inserted page breaks and resets all breaks to automatic.

To reset all page breaks while in Page Break Preview mode, 
right click any cell and select Reset All Page Breaks.

Reset All Page Breaks in Microsoft Excel 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013, 365

Adjusting the Print Area:
Sometimes you may not want to print all of the data in your worksheet. The outer solid blue lines indicate the area that will be printed. Drag these lines vertically or horizontally t
o adjust the Print Area.

Drag To Adjust Print Area in Microsoft Excel 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013, 365

Resetting the Print Area:
Resetting the print area will cause all of the data on the worksheet to be included in the Print Area.

To reset your Print Area, right click any cell and select Reset Print Area.

Reset Print Area In Page Break Preview in Microsoft Excel 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013, 365

Exiting Page Break Preview mode:
To exit Page Break Preview and return to Normal view, click the Normal icon on the right side of the Excel Status Bar (or press ALT, WL).


Normal Worksheet View Icon in Microsoft Excel 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013, 365


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