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The Excel Addict - Help with Excel 2013, 2010, 2007, 2003

August 18, 2016
 

Greetings from The Excel Addict
Hi fellow Excel Addict,

Francis Hayes - TheExcelAddict.comThanks for joining me today for my 'Excel in Minutes' tip.

If you find today's tip helpful, please feel free to share it with your friends—chances are they will too.

I
f you missed my 'Excel in Seconds' newsletter on Tuesday, I showed you how to 'Get Back to Your Selection'. You can read the tip here.

Keep on
Excelling,
Francis Hayes (The Excel Addict)
Email:  fhayes[AT]TheExcelAddict.com


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Today's Microsoft Excel Tip

Use Custom Views to Print Letter And Legal Pages From The Same Worksheet

Although I rarely ever have a need to print both letter and legal pages from the same worksheet, apparently there are many other Excel users who do.

I often hear the frustrations of having switch back and forth between letter and legal print settings every time they need to print one or the other report.

I recommend that, if you have a workbook that contains both letter and legal pages, it's usually easier to put them in separate worksheets. However, if you do find yourself having to print letter and legal pages from the same worksheet, you CAN do it without having to go to Page Setup and fiddling with your print settings.

Setting up a Custom View for each will make things a little easier.

Unfortunately though, you cannot print both letter and legal pages with a single print job. You will still need to print the letter section, then print the legal section.

1) First, set up one of the areas for printing (e.g. letter) with print area,  orientation, paper size, and any other print settings you want;

2) From the View menu select Custom Views;

3) Click the Add… button;

Add Custom View Letter in Microsoft Excel 2007 2010 2013 2016 365
4) Give the Custom View a name (e.g. Letter Pages) and click OK;

5) Now repeat the previous 4 steps for the Legal section of your report;

Add Custom View Legal in Microsoft Excel 2007 2010 2013 2016 365
6) When you need to print the Letter section, click View, Custom Views, select the view name and click Show;

Show Custom View Letter in Microsoft Excel 2007 2010 2013 2016 365
7) Now you can print the letter section as normal (i.e. File, Print);

8) To print the legal section, click View, Custom Views, select the view name and click Show;

Show Custom View Legal in Microsoft Excel 2007 2010 2013 2016 365
9) Now you can print the legal section as normal (i.e. File, Print).

There's more to Custom Views
You may have figured out that Excel's Custom Views feature is not limited to saving the paper size setting as in the example above.

Maybe you find that, with some of your worksheets, you frequently need to change certain settings. Using Custom Views allows you to quickly restore those specific settings whenever you need them.

When you create a view, you can save any of the following settings...
  • the current cell selection, 
  • column widths and row heights (including hidden columns and rows), 
  • display settings on the Advanced tab of the Excel Options dialog box,
  • the current position and size of the document window and the window pane arrangement (including frozen panes),
  • (Optional) print settings (e.g. page settings, margins, headers and footers, and print area)
  • (Optional) filter settings.
Custom View Optional Settings in Microsoft Excel 2007 2010 2013 2016 365
By creating Custom Views, you can quickly restore those settings without having to manually selecting them each time.

Although you can create multiple custom views for each worksheet, you can only apply a custom view to the worksheet for which it was created.

When you no longer need a custom view, you can delete it. (View, Custom Views, select a view from the list and click Delete.

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